How Much Does a Good Mattress Cost?

Mattresses sold today range in price from $150 or less to more than $5,000, but most shoppers can find the mattress they need for under $1,000. The price-point of a mattress depends on several factors, including type, size, height, material composition, and durability. This guide offers shopping tips for comparing mattresses based on different factors and finding the right model for you and your sleep partner at a reasonable price.

Average Mattress Prices

Mattress type impacts the price-point more than any other factor. The price range of foam mattresses, for example, varies significantly from the price ranges of latex or hybrid models. The table below features current price ranges for five common mattress types; please note that the prices listed below are for Queen-size models.

Mattress TypeLow Price RangeMedium Price RangeHigh Price RangeAverage Price (Approximate)Customer Satisfaction Rating
InnerspringLess than $700$700 to $1,200More than $1,200$95065%
FoamLess than $600$600 to $1,200More than $1,200$90072.5%
LatexLess than $1,500$1,500 to $2,500More than $2,500$2,00076.4%
HybridLess than $1,200$1,200 to $2,000More than $2,000$1,65071%
AirbedLess than $1,500$1,500 to $2,500More than $2,500$2,25079.3%

Next, let’s look at some factors that influence the price of different mattress types.

Cost Factors for Innerspring Mattresses

Here are some important considerations to make when looking at innersprings:

  • The price-point of an innerspring mattress is often tied to durability and lifespan. Cheaper models tend to feature polyfoam comfort layers and bonnell coils, which typically perform for three to five years. Costlier innersprings may feature memory foam or latex in the comfort layer and more durable coils — such as offset or continuous-wire coils — in the support core.
  • Some innersprings are constructed with pocketed (or fabric-wrapped) coils; it’s important to note that mattresses featuring at least two inches of memory foam and/or latex in the comfort layer and pocketed coils in the support core are technically considered hybrids.
  • Gauge (or thickness) can be used to determine how durable a mattress coil is; thicker low-gauge coils are more durable than thinner high-gauge coils.
  • Many mattress manufacturers list ‘coil count’ as a measure of quality and durability — and the price may reflect this — but coil count does not necessarily reflect the lifespan of an innerspring mattress.

Cost Factors for Foam Mattresses

Foam mattresses are typically priced using the following criteria:

  • Foam density plays a role in mattress durability, and is a key factor for foam mattress pricing. Low-density foams are softer and tend to deteriorate quickly, and are most often used in relatively cheap mattress models. High-density foams are firmer and tend to last longer; they are usually used in models with more expensive price-points.
  • Another key consideration is the type of foam used. Polyfoam (even high-density polyfoam) will degrade faster than most memory foams. As a result, the cost of an all-polyfoam mattress is usually much lower than the cost of a memory foam mattress. Likewise, mattresses with specialty memory foam (such as gel or copper-infused memory foam) are more expensive than those with standard memory foam.
  • Most sleepers feel more comfortable on memory foam than polyfoam. However, price-point does not appear to be a significant factor in customer experiences with memory foam compared to performance factors like firmness and conforming/pressure-relieving abilities. For this reason, shoppers may be able to find a memory foam mattress that suits their preferences at a relatively low price.

Cost Factors for Latex Mattresses

The price of a latex mattress is often determined by the following factors:

  • Latex in mattresses is produced using one of two processes. The Dunlop process produces denser and heavier latex that is most often used in support cores. The Talalay process produces lighter and less dense latex that is typically used in comfort layers. Talalay latex tends to be more expensive than Dunlop latex, but some mattresses contain both.
  • The price of a latex mattress will also depend on whether natural or synthetic latex is used. Natural latex is extracted from rubber trees and produced without fillers using either the Dunlop or Talalay process. Synthetic latex, on the other hand, is entirely manmade, but is still processed using the Talalay or Dunlop method. The differences in firmness and feel between natural and synthetic latex are negotiable. However, sleepers are much more susceptible to allergic reactions on natural latex.
  • An important distinction for shoppers is the difference between ‘natural latex’ and ‘100% natural latex’; the latter does not contain any fillers whatsoever, while the former may not be entirely natural. In some cases, mattresses sold as ‘natural latex’ are actually made of mostly synthetic latex.

Cost Factors for Hybrid Mattresses

Cost considerations for hybrid mattresses include the following points:

  • In order to be considered a true hybrid, a mattress must have at least two inches of memory foam and/or latex in the comfort system and a pocketed coil support core. Many mattresses are sold as hybrids, even though they don’t meet this criteria. For example, some models sold as hybrids feature latex and memory foam components, but the support core is made of polyfoam, not pocketed coils.
  • Some hybrids feature a layer of microcoils in the comfort system for added conforming and pressure relief. Models with microcoil layers are usually more expensive than standard foam-and-coil hybrids. However, customer satisfaction ratings between microcoil and non-microcoil hybrids are comparable, suggesting that these components do not play a significant role in sleeper experiences.

Cost Factors for Airbed Mattresses

An airbed is defined as any mattress that features air chambers in the support core, rather than foam or coil layers. Airbeds have the highest customer satisfaction rating among all mattress types — as well as the highest average price. When pricing airbed mattresses, consider the following:

  • Most airbeds sold today feature manual or remote controls that allow users to inflate or deflate air to match their comfort preferences; many can be toggled using online apps. Remote-control airbeds — especially ones that utilize smart-app technology — are almost always more expensive than manual-control models.
  • Airbeds with memory foam, latex and/or microcoils in the comfort layer are usually priced higher than those with standard polyfoam comfort systems.
  • Airbed prices somewhat correlate to mattress height, with thicker models being the more expensive option. The number of air chambers may also play a role; traditional airbeds have one to two air chambers, but some newer models have as many as six individual chambers (and cost more on average).

Which Mattress Type Is Best for You?

Now that we’ve explored cost factors affecting the price of a mattress, let’s look at some distinct qualities associated with different mattress types. Customers can use metrics like these to determine which mattress is best for them based on their top priorities as shoppers and sleepers.

QualityInnerspringFoamLatexHybridAirbed
Average Lifespan5 to 7 Years6 to 7 Years8 Years or More6 to 7 Years8 Years or More
Conforming/Pressure ReliefPoor to FairGood to Very GoodGoodGood to Very GoodGood
SexGood to Very GoodFairFair to GoodGood to Very GoodFair
Heat RetentionGood to Very GoodPoor to FairFairFair to GoodFair to Good
NoiseFairVery Good to ExcellentVery Good to ExcellentGood to Very GoodFair to Good
Off-Gassing OdorGood to Very GoodPoor to FairFair to GoodPoor to FairFair to Good
Edge SupportGood to Very GoodPoor to FairPoor to FairGood to Very GoodFair to Good
AvailabilityWideWideSomewhat LimitedSomewhat LimitedVery Limited

Additional Mattress Costs

The original price-point is not the only cost associated with mattress ownership. Here are a few more costs that may arise for mattress owners:

  • Foundations: Mattress customers usually have the option of purchasing a matching foundation to go with their new mattress; most foundations are priced at $150 or higher.
  • Shipping: Many mattress manufacturers offer free delivery to customers in the continental United States; these deliveries are mostly coordinated through UPS, FedEx and other ground courier services. A few manufacturers also offer free shipping to customers in Alaska, Hawaii, and offshore U.S. territories, but most impose shipping charges of at least $100 for these locations; additional fees may also apply for customers in remote locations in the continental U.S. For companies that do not offer free mattress shipping, customers should expect to pay at least $100.
  • In-Home Assembly: A large number of mattress companies offer delivery that includes in-home mattress assembly and packaging waste removal; this is often called ‘White Glove delivery’. The standard cost of White Glove delivery is $99, but some companies charge more.
  • Old Mattress Removal: Mattress companies that offer White Glove delivery will often remove the customer’s old mattress for an additional charge (usually $50). However, most mattress companies that use ground couriers like UPS and FedEx for deliveries do not offer this service.
  • Mattress Returns: Mattress sleep trials are common; most companies allow customers to return their mattress within 30 to 90 days of their original purchase in exchange for a refund (specific lengths vary by company). However, many sleep trials include hidden ‘shipping and handling’ fees for customers that return their mattress during the sleep trial. These details are usually included in the fine print of the company’s sleep trial and return policy.
  • Mattress Exchanges: In addition to mattress returns, some companies allow customers to exchange their mattress during their sleep trial for a model of a different size and/or firmness. The same ‘shipping and handling’ fees apply. For mattress upgrades, customers will be required to pay the difference in price between the original and the replacement. Typically, one exchange is allowed per sleep trial.

Warranty Costs

The standard mattress warranty lasts at least 10 years; some span as long as 25 to 30 years. Warranty terms vary significantly between mattress manufacturers, and there are several costs associated with them.

Most mattress warranties require customers to cover shipping and handling fees associated with repairs for mattresses with defects (such as deep indentations or protruding coils). Additionally, customers should expect to pay shipping and handling fees for replacing their defective mattress with a new model.

Another important warranty consideration is whether the coverage is nonprorated or prorated; some warranties are entirely nonprorated, while others are nonprorated for a set number of years and prorated for the remainder of the warranty coverage period. Nonprorated coverage means that, with the exception of shipping and handling fees, owners do not need to pay extra costs for replacing a defective mattress. During prorated coverage periods, customers must pay extra charges for replacing their mattress; these charges are calculated by multiplying a percentage of the original mattress price (typically 5% to 10%) by the number of years of ownership.

For example, let’s say a mattress costs $1,000 and is covered under a 20-year warranty with five years of nonprorated coverage and 15 years of prorated coverage with a 5% prorated charge. If the mattress needs to be replaced during the first five years, then the owner will only be required to pay shipping and handling fees. If the mattress needs to be replaced during the tenth year, then prorated charges are calculated as 10 (years) by 5%; this means that the owner will be responsible for paying half the original price (or $500) to have the mattress replaced. During the eleventh year, this charge will increase to 55% (or $550), and so on until the 20-year period ends.

Most — but not all — 10-year warranties are entirely nonprorated. Some warranties that extend 15 to 20 years or longer are fully nonprorated, but most included prorated coverage periods. In some cases, a mattress warranty will only include two to three years of nonprorated coverage. For this reason, customers should place more emphasis on the length of the nonprorated coverage period than the overall warranty length. Furthermore, most industry experts agree that a mattress should be replaced every seven to eight years; this somewhat negates the need for warranties that extend beyond 10 years.

Conclusion

Generally speaking, the average sleeper will be able to spend $1,000 or less for a mattress that suits their comfort and support preferences. However, mattress shoppers are urged to thoroughly research different products before making a purchase. In order to find the right mattress at the lowest available price, be sure to compare different models based on factors like type, material composition, firmness, and durability, as well as company policies regarding shipping and delivery, sleep trials, and warranty coverage.

To view and compare different mattress brands based on price, please visit our Product Comparison Page.